Love, Death & Robots

While thinking about how I could start this blog, I was thinking about one thing: this series isn’t for everyone. And that’s exactly what Hollywood needs to do more of. It needs to stop making things ‘for everybody.’

This series is absolutely bonkers with violence, explicit scenes, and episodes. From minds of Tim Miller and David Fincher made a show with great animation of a mix with Twilight Zone and Black Mirror storytelling. Credit must be given in all episodes to the animators – the levels of technical detail and stylised novelty are incredible in every instance, showing glimpses of future possibilities.

This show is amazing! Very good short stories, graphics are flawless, distorted graphics and voices are on point, and I enjoy how dark some of the episodes are.

I knew I loved it when I wanted to start seeing the series. I love every minute of every episode, great variety of concepts, different art styles, and storytelling. I don’t wanna compare which one was the best but I felt every episode was the best in its’s own way. I do feel that as of yet, even if there is a lot of adult imagery and mature narratives, the theme of Love hasn’t been explored very deeply.

This series impresses me the most with its resplendent visual effects. The plots of most episodes are simple but “magical”, with something either profound or amusing in behind. By far my favorite is from S3 episode 2, “Bad Traveling”, it’s able to pull off a cinematic and thrilling story worth over an hour of content within 15 minutes. Love, Death & Robots makes a clear statement once again that time only encapsulates what it can show.

My overall review is: Season one was brilliant, a game changer. Season two had its amazing moments but also its flaws. Season three, however, manages to have you sit in front of the screen again – awestruck and amazed by the storytelling, emotions, and editing/sound.

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